Who Said It Better?

In an effort to make sure that his grave was not disturbed, it is said that Shakespeare penned his own epitaph and it reads as follows:

Shakespeare’s Grave
Stratford-upon-Avon

“Good friend for Jesus sake forbeare, To dig the dust enclosed here. Blessed be the man that spares these stones, And cursed be he that moves my bones.”

Scary stuff- and I’m not sure if it worked but it may have. Curses are pretty convincing to a large segment of the population.

On the other hand that are grave makers that aren’t as creepy or theatrical but will scare the heck out of you all the same- not that they’ve run people off but they really are the stuff of nightmares.

Here are two markers that can be found in Red Gate Woods, outside of Chicago Illinois and I’m good. I don’t need to visit these sites- but I have to admit.

I am curious

Photo A.M. Moscoso

“THE WORLD’S FIRST NUCLEAR REACTOR WAS REBUILT AT THIS SITE IN 1943 AFTER INITIAL OPERATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO THIS REACTOR (CP-2) AND THE FIRST HEAVY WATER MODERATED REACTOR (CP-3) WERE MAJOR FACILITIES AROUND WHICH DEVELOPED THE ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY THIS SITE WAS RELEASED BY THE LABORATORY IN 1956 AND THE U.S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION THEN BURIED THE REACTORS HERE.”

…and at Site M: 

“CAUTION-DO NOT DIG Buried in this area is radioactive material from nuclear research conducted here 1945-1949. Burial area is marked by six corner markers 100ft from this center point. There is no danger to visitors. U.S. Department of Energy 1978”

 

2 thoughts on “Who Said It Better?

  1. I remember a newstory about some little boys ( South America? Mexico? ) who found radioactiove material that looked like what they described as blue(?) fairy dust. They played with it and of course they became very ill and died. I believe they were buried in lead coffins- the reason being if they had been cremated their ashes would have been radioactive too. It’s an old news story. Anyway, I also remember the conversation went on to say that being able to warn people in the future about radioactive sites was going to be difficult because of communication issues- English for example as we speak it now will not read or sound the same in 500 years.

    PS- I did find an article that referenced this incident- the children were refered to as ‘scavengers’.
    https://fas.org/blogs/fas/2013/12/the-mexican-radiation-accident-part-ii/

  2. The granite in the old Stagg Field at the U of Chicago was radioactive, and the field was demolished and replaced by the graduate research library. I was told that workers installing the foundation had to contend with radiation in the ground as they dug.

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